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Hardening Guide for phpList
Crowdfunding on Crowd Supply (Review of my experience)
WordPress Multisite on the Darknet (Mercator .onion alias)
Detecting (Malicious) Unicode in GitHub PRs
Nightmare on Lemmy Street (A Fediverse GDPR Horror Story)
Continuous Documentation: Hosting Read the Docs on GitHub Pages (2/2)
Trusted Boot (Anti-Evil-Maid, Heads, and PureBoot)
Introducing BusKill: A Kill Cord for your Laptop
WordPress Profiling with XHProf (Debugging & Optimizing Speed)
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WordPress Profiling with XHProf (Debugging & Optimizing Speed)

Debugging & Optimizing Wordpress Speed with XHProf

This guide will show you how to generate and view XHProf reports of your WordPress Site.

This is useful so you can drill-down and see exactly how many microseconds each of your scripts and functions (themes & plugins) are running when generating a page -- slowing down your website visitors' page load speed.

Michael Altfield

Hi, I’m Michael Altfield. I write articles about opsec, privacy, and devops ➡

About Michael


. . . → Read More: WordPress Profiling with XHProf (Debugging & Optimizing Speed)

Detecting (Malicious) Unicode in GitHub PRs

Detecting Malicious Unicode in GitHub Pull Requests

This article will describe how you can utilize GitHub Actions to scan user-contributed PRs for unicode and automatically warn you if such commits contain (potentially invisible & malicious) unicode characters.

Why

Last month Trojan Source was published --- which described how malicious unicode characters could make source code appear benign, yet compile to something quite malicious.

Michael Altfield

Hi, I’m Michael Altfield. I write articles about opsec, privacy, and devops ➡

About Michael


. . . → Read More: Detecting (Malicious) Unicode in GitHub PRs

Continuous Documentation: Hosting Read the Docs on GitHub Pages (2/2)

Continuous Documentation with Read the Docs (2/2)

This post will describe how add translations (i18n), pdf/epub builds, and branch-specific versioned documentation to a Read-the-Docs-themed sphinx site hosted with GitHub Pages and built with GitHub's free CI/CD tools.

This is part two of a two-part series. Before reading this, you should already be familiar with Continuous Documentation: Hosting Read the Docs on GitHub Pages (1/2).

ⓘ Note: If you don't care about how this works and you just want to make a functional repo, you can just fork my 'rtd-github-pages' GitHub repo.

Michael Altfield

Hi, I’m Michael Altfield. I write articles about opsec, privacy, and devops ➡

About Michael


. . . → Read More: Continuous Documentation: Hosting Read the Docs on GitHub Pages (2/2)

Continuous Documentation: Hosting Read the Docs on GitHub Pages (1/2)

Continuous Documentation with Read the Docs (1/2)

This post will describe how to host a sphinx-powered site (using the Read the Docs theme) on your own GitHub Pages site, built with GitHub's free CI/CD tools.

ⓘ Note: If you don't care about how this works and you just want to make a functional repo, you can just fork my 'rtd-github-pages' GitHub repo.

Michael Altfield

Hi, I’m Michael Altfield. I write articles about opsec, privacy, and devops ➡

About Michael


. . . → Read More: Continuous Documentation: Hosting Read the Docs on GitHub Pages (1/2)