Using uBlock Origin to Whitelist

As some mega websites deploy APIs that are used nearly ubiquitously on most of the Internet’s websites (I’m looking at you Facebook & Google), I’ve begun to compartmentalize my browsers to “jail” specific website usage to a single, sandboxed browser (profile). This is sometimes referred to as a Single Site Browser (SSB).

Besides making sure . . . → Read More: Using uBlock Origin to Whitelist

Let’s Encrypt!

Finally, this website is (only) accessible over https!

. . . → Read More: Let’s Encrypt!

Tor->VPN in TAILS to bypass tor-blocking

This post will describe how to route outgoing traffic in a python script running on TAILS first through Tor, then through a SOCKS proxy created with an ssh tunnel. This is helpful when you want to use the anonymizing capabilities of tor, but you need to access a website that explicitly blocks tor exit nodes . . . → Read More: Tor->VPN in TAILS to bypass tor-blocking

pycurl through Tor without leaking DNS lookups

This article describes the correct way to use pycurl over Tor, such that both DNS lookup data and HTTP(S) traffic is sent through Tor’s SOCKS5 proxy.

If you google “pycurl tor”, one of the first results is a stackoverflow post that describes how to configure pycurl using the pycurl.PROXYTYPE_SOCKS5 setting. Indeed, even the tutorial To . . . → Read More: pycurl through Tor without leaking DNS lookups

Eavesdropping Analysis of PGP Metadata

This post attempts to answer the following question: If an evesdropper intercepts a message encrypted with gpg, how much information will they be able to extract from the message without a decryption key?

I will show the unencrypted metadata added to a GPG-encypted message, and I will present commands that can be used to extract . . . → Read More: Eavesdropping Analysis of PGP Metadata

Browsing without being tracked via Fingerprinting

Your browser aggrigates a *lot* of data about your computer, and it won’t hesitate to provide all of this data to a nosy web site. In fact, if a website requests a large dataset of your computer’s configuration, concatinates it together, and passes it through a hash function, the resulting hash can be farily unique.

. . . → Read More: Browsing without being tracked via Fingerprinting

Extend GPG Key Expiration

I came back from my “cross-country bicycle trip”:http://1guy2biketrips.michaelaltfield.net to discover I could no longer send signed email because my key expired! I’ve also changed colleges from “SPSU”:http://www.spsu.edu/ to “UCF”:http://www.ucf.edu, and my old college is expiring my email address, so here’s what I need to do:

# Extend my key’s expiration another year # Add new . . . → Read More: Extend GPG Key Expiration

Plausibly Deniable File Encryption

Plausibly deniable encryption is a fascinating concept. For example, “TrueCrypt”:http://www.truecrypt.org/ (a FOSS for hard disk encryption) has a wonderful “Hidden Volume”:http://www.truecrypt.org/docs/?s=hidden-volume feature that provides “Plausible Deniability”:http://www.truecrypt.org/docs/?s=plausible-deniability. The concept is: you install 2 OS instances on your computer–1 in a hidden volume. If, for whatever reason, you were forced to reveal your encrypted data, you could . . . → Read More: Plausibly Deniable File Encryption

Iterative MITM Packet Sniffer

So, I got into a discussion with a friend of mine in my Computer Security class at UCF about this script. I’m posting this for historical and educational purposes only. As always, I never condone the implementation of any of my content for malicious intent. Moreover, this script has flaws that * would make it . . . → Read More: Iterative MITM Packet Sniffer

Sabayon, KDE, and Evolution

I recently reformatted my hard drive–switching from pure Gentoo to the Sabayon fork. Sabayon did for Gentoo what Ubuntu did for Debian. It’s generally a lot easier to use, but–unlike Ubuntu–it doesn’t sacrifice functionality for ease-of-use.

. . . → Read More: Sabayon, KDE, and Evolution